Fall 2013 Pyrotech Wetsuit

O'Neill Pyrotech Wetsuit

O’Neill Pyrotech 5.5/4mm Wetsuit

The new Pyrotech 5.5/4mm Hooded Wetsuit is in. These are Fall 2013 wetsuits from the O’Neill line and Cleanline Surf is the first to have them. The Pyrotech wetsuit is the replacement to the O’Neill RG8 wetsuit series and this year it has been revamped with the new TechnoButter Neoprene exclusive to O’Neill’s wetsuit line. Basically this is my new favorite wetsuit. O’Neill took their RG8 series, which was already my favorite suit, and took out the poly-fleece lining, and replaced the neoprene with the lighter, and more flexible TechnoButter Neoprene.

How much lighter is it?

The Technobutter neoprene is boasted to be 20% lighter, and absorbs 30% less water. I’m not sure what neoprene they are comparing it too(they don’t say for some reason) hmmm, but that doesn’t really matter. When I pick the suit up it is noticeably lighter than the RG8 in the same thickness. That is without getting the suit wet. Once it’s wet I don’t have the personal experience to give an opinion yet, but from what I’ve heard the suit feels much lighter in the water also. Look for a full review from a staff member at Cleanline Surf in the near future.

From O’Neil:

O’Neill’s new Pyrotech Series Combines our exclusive Technobutter-Air Firewall insulation, Single Fluid Seam Weld and F.U.Z.E Closure System. Lighter, warmer, more insulating and quick drying with improved ease of entry. Pyrotech is the latest advancement in cold water wetsuit technology from the leaders in innovation for over 60 years.

Style # 4194

Retail Price: $439.95

Pyrotech Wetsuit Inside

Pyrotech Wetsuit (Inside)

Features:

  • Attached Hood
  • F.U.Z.E Front Upper Zip Entry with Code Red Zipper and Drain Holes
  • Single Fluid Seam Weld(Watertight Stitchless Technology) – Keeps water from entering at all seams and critical points.
  • Technobutter & Technobutter-Air Firewall Neoprene – The most advanced super stretch neoprene available on the market. 20% lighter, 30% less water absorption with quick dry properties.
  • Super Seal Cuffs – O’Neill’s new Super Seal Cuff is fused to create a very low profile at the cuff ending creating the best seal ever.
  • Krypto Knee Padzz
  • External Key Pocket with Loop
  • Plasma Wrist and Ankle Seals
  • LSD – Lumbar Seamless Design

 

 

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Deep Water, Part 5 – Ireland (ep. 2 of 2)

While Kohl Christensen and Danilo Couto were in Ireland, a much larger swell formed off the coast. The forecast was calling for huge, windy seas, but the chance there might be a window to surf kept them where they were. It was the right call, and it brought them some of the biggest, craziest surf they’d seen all year.

 

Deep Water, Part 5 – Ireland (ep. 2 of 2) from Patagonia on Vimeo.

How to Read a Surf Report – The Beginners Guide

Oregon Surf Forcast

If you’re in the Northwest and you’re looking to rent surfboards, wetsuits, or other surf gear, knowing if it is the right time to go is important. Surf conditions can change quickly, however using an online surf forecasting site you can be fairly certain if conditions are going to be good for renting. Learning how to read a surf forecast isn’t difficult, but many surf report sites don’t explain how to interpret the information provided. All surf forecasting sites give you the same information. Wind speed and direction, swell direction, swell height, and swell period. The most misunderstood part tends to be the swell period. This is the part that follows the swell height and is measured in seconds.

Example: 6ft at 10 seconds.

The swells period is the part that reads “at 10 seconds”. This means that there is 10 seconds on average in between waves. A long period (or interval) means the waves are traveling faster, which means they have more power, and will become larger when they reach the shore than waves the same height but with a shorter period. This means that the example swell above could end up breaking and be 7 ft tall, while if the period was at 20 seconds it could break and become 10 ft tall with a lot more power behind it.

Too Big For Beginners

Too Big For Beginners

The most important thing to consider is if the waves are going to be too big. Too big will vary for people of different experience levels, but generally if you are just starting out at surfing look for a day with a swell of 3-4ft to be safe. There really aren’t any deal breakers after knowing the size of the swell, but there are things to look for that are more ideal than others. For instance the wind plays a large role in surf conditions. For beginners little or no wind is the best bet. It’s just one less factor to deal with. If it’s windy it can be harder to get into waves, harder to balance when standing up, there can be more chop on the water, and you can get spray in your face making it harder to see. If there is wind, the best wind is offshore wind(East wind in Oregon), this will hold up the waves longer, giving you a bigger window to get into them.

3ft at 15 Seconds - Little to No Wind

3ft at 12 Seconds – Little to No Wind – Perfect for Learning to Surf

Lastly the swell direction can affect how much the swell is going to reach certain beaches. Open beaches will pick up every swell direction, but beaches that are protected by a cape, or outcrops of rocks will block swell from certain directions. Take Oswald West State Park for instance. The beach faces slightly south, and is protected by rocks to the north and south. The swell that is going to show up the largest at this beach is a SW swell, and a NW will show the weakest.

Shortsands Beach - Oswald West State Park

Tip: If the swell seems a little big for you, and it is a NW swell, then go to a beach that is protected at the north end.